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Neo-Sporean Adventure Academy: ~What should the next Lecture be about?~  XML
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MobsterMania

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Introduction

Welcome to the Adventure Academy! Here you will learn the latest in professional adventure creation, the very kind of creation disciplines that distinguished adventures made by legends such as Remypas, hk1x1, and Parkaboy, to name a few. Now you too can become a legendary creator and tame the editor to do your bidding! Plus, learn a few more techniques that have only been discovered the past year by members of the devoted community that remain. No more frustration, disappointment, and tears...only creativity and improvement.

We offer courses in Complexity Management, Design and Surroundings, Story Formation, Conflict Resolution and Prevention, and more!

If you want to get your creation reviewed, consult our Reviewing division at NPR.

This was designed to be an extension to the existing Advanced Guide to Adventures, which is stickied.

About Your Head Instructor

Most of you are familiar with me (and my nosy advertisements) but for those who do not, I am HRmatthew (forum alias MobsterMania), a long time Spore addict, who registered in 2009. My reputation did not come until late 2010 however, with the advent of my classic Words of the Wasteland which told the engaging story of an exiled Captain and his exploits on his marooned planet with the hostile Scrap Pirates. I was known for being a skilled creator versed in the art of scrap, something that Grimbot formerly held before leaving. Players admired the memorable characters, stunning scenery, and compelling story. Unfortunately, lack of interest caused the series' close sometime in 2011, with myself leaving Spore in 2012.

I returned in August 2013 in surprise to see the community still there. Eager to create once more, I made Deleted! in December, with Those Who Were Left and Legacy of Sensenet following after. These adventures were also critically acclaimed, perhaps even more so than more Words series, because of their powerful underlying themes tailored to appeal to Spore players today. Combined with immersing scenery and innovative techniques, these adventures have been held as some of the pinnacles of the Spore community following the massive exodus of the old breed.

It stands to reason, because of my adventures, that I know a lot about creating adventures. Following the publication of Legacy of Sensenet, I decided to create this to guide other aspiring creators. I wanted to share my knowledge so that others can contribute to the revived Adventure community.

Let's get started!

Enough talk about me, let's talk about you. You want to improve your skill in the game you love. You want to bring your imagination to life. Let's get to it!

------------------------------------

Prerequisites
This is not a tutorial designed for beginners: this is for people who are aware of the extent of the editor. If you do not know how to do simple things like disguise gates, hide objects, include descriptions, or just the editor in general, please consult this:

The "Basic" section of the former Advanced Guide to Adventures:
http://forum.spore.com/jforum/posts/list/53381.page

You should acknowledge that adventures take time and effort. A LOT OF TIME AND EFFORT.If you do not care about Spore (why are you even here anyway?), are extremely pressed for time and cannot fit adventures into your schedule for whatever reason, this guide is not recommended for you. This of course does not mean busy people can't make use of this guide, but I say this just to emphasize.

---------------------------------

Courses
(The curricula is being written, so please be patient. They should be ready very soon)
-Complexity Management (2nd post)
-Design & Surroundings
-Story Formation and Storytelling
-Conflict Resolution & Prevention

---------------------------------

Reviewing Division

Send your adventures for review at NPR!

This message was edited 6 times. Last update was at 02/14/2016 01:43:14


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MobsterMania

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Complexity Management



There is no sight more frustrating, more disappointing, more agitating than this. Indeed, this is perhaps one of the main reasons why people are frustrated with, and perhaps leave (gasp!) Spore despite the wondrous capabilities of GA. How preposterous, I say to them, as I have gathered many tricks to mitigate this issue!

Approximate complexity values of different things

For our purposes, power-ups, effects, sounds, and such have negligible effect. They still take up complexity, but so little that it is not necessary to calculate their value. Of course, it's best to lay them out as early as you can.

One complexity dot equals the following:

90 Disguised Blue Gates of 1 Model
36 Buildings of 1 Model
42 Vehicles of 1 Model
42 Creatures of 1 Model
90 Adventure Objects of 1 Model

-----------------------

Of course, most people do not use just one model, but many. Unique models take up more complexity, so let's see just how much. All of these also equal 1 Complexity Dot.

44 Disguised Blue Gates of 1 Model and 43 of another Model (Adventure Objects also follow this trend)
20 Creatures of 1 Model and 20 of another Model
20 Vehicles of 1 Model and 20 of another Model
17 Buildings of 1 Model and 17 of another

--------------------------------

As you can see, unique models have a considerable impact on complexity. The amount allowed for each model is around half of the number of just one model needed to make one complexity dot. It stands to reason then, that three unique models will only allow a little less than a third as well. Let's see if this is the case.

One complexity dot:

11 Buildings of 1 model, and 11 of the two others (This is one less than a third of 36, or 12)
29 Disguised Blue Gates of 1 Model, and 28 of the other two. (This is one and two less respectively than a third of 90, or 30).

There's definitely a predictable trend here. That said, we can assume that if you have 16 unique models, the maximum number allowed in the adventure for each model would be 1/16 of the "base" value, or how many of just one model are needed to equal one complexity dot. In the case of disguised blue gates, the maximum number that each 16 models would be allowed would be a little less than 6.

Conclusions?

It does seem that the complexity meter is fairly generous, at least to me it is. But why does it seem to fill up faster than my stomach when I go eat at Golden Corral? As you can see, the number of unique models has a huge impact on how many times it can occur in the adventure. I will not test combinations of these object types because that will take forever. But you can imagine how amateur adventure makers will fill up that meter quickly, with all of their models and such. Here are some basic conclusions.

-Buildings take up the most complexity, with only 36 models of one model allowed for one complexity dot. So, if you're a person that makes walls, ceilings, etc. buildings, you will eat up the complexity fast. Same for if you are assembling a city with buildings.
-Disguised blue gates and adventure objects are by far the most efficient, with 90 required of one model to take up one complexity dot.
-Creatures and vehicles are, while not as costly as buildings, still very complexity intensive at 42 for one model to take up one dot. If you have a lot of creatures and vehicles, like in many war adventures, you will see that bar rising fast.
-Having many unique models occur many times will put a strain on your complexity meter. Especially if you use buildings a lot.

What's the solution?

Judging from our data, it is best that we not only use disguised blue gates as often as possible and buildings as seldom as possible, but also reduce the number of unique models required. Therefore, we can formulate the following complexity-reducing strategies:

Use blue gates for props that occur many times, and buildings only for times when examining, destroying, etc. are necessary. It is important to note that if you run out of Gameplay item slots, it's recommended to use buildings for props that occur the least and disguised blue gates the most

For example, if you want to include a skyscraper to occur multiple times in your adventure, a hot dog stand distributed throughout your colony, or an armada of creepy vans parked in several alleyways, it's best to make those props disguised gates. Here's a palette from my latest adventure.



These props, with the exception of the disguised truck and blue machine thing at the bottom of the left column, occur many instances. Most of them have over 5 occurrences. Note their strange PNGs: this is because they are multiprops. But we'll get to that later. Now, what should buildings be used for?



In the adventure, the Squawk Box is examined, the CEO Office Shelf is destroyed, and the rest are seldom present. These props only occur either once or two or three times; the one that occurs more is the Mansion 2nd floor prop, and that was because the vents at the top appear many times in the adventure for their animation. As you can see, you can "multiprop" buildings as well.

Note that most of these are interior props. This is because I prefer to use buildings for interiors since the camera will not zoom out of the model like it would with a disguised blue gate interior. This hurts the immersion factor, something that my adventures are particularly skilled at delivering. But some interiors occur several times: why use buildings for them? I will discuss that in the third bullet point. But overall, buildings should only occur if they need to be interacted with in some way other than moving to them, and disguised gates should be used for everything else. They're most effective for scenery objects, though. Buildings, however, do have those cool effects like the spinning windmill and such. It is your judgement whether or not this is essential for your adventure.

Reduce unique models by making props that serve multiple purposes

This is perhaps one of the most useful ways to both reduce complexity and save space in the limit 6 pages of prop types you have. This will most often occur in the Gameplay Objects palette since, if you follow my advice, you will use disguised gates more than buildings. This is not well known either, and is very agitating to do if you don't have the Building Rotator mod.

Here is that mod. Place it in the Data folder of your GA files (Spore_EP1)
https://mega.co.nz/#!DIlhBZib!B0pjB8U6UvQVNxnGGcI0rebCO6hVP3jvS7iAmsI_MCs

Most creators have objects like crates, benches, terminals, etc. basically props that, as stand-alone creations, do not take up much complexity in their respective editors. But a low complexity object and high complexity object take up the same amount of complexity in an adventure; it's best then to use up all of that complexity for something. And that is for these multi-purpose props. Here are some in-editor examples.





The first two basically have many props rotated in various ways. They are designed such that if you submerge the entire prop into the ground such that only the "top" building is showing, rotating the entire prop 90 degrees will yield you a different building.

The first prop however, has two laboratory objects on the bottom and top "slots." This is because these laboratory objects were designed to be placed against a wall, so the wall would hide the other object inside. This allowed me to cram six props into one. This means that these multi-props, while they follow a general formula, must be tailored to the purpose of that prop, its locations in the adventure, and the level of detail you want. Keep in mind that in order to fit all these props, you'll need to make them fairly small. And for those that desire quality, upscaling tiny objects may not look so pretty. Also you may want your props to be more detailed than what a multi-prop creation would allow each individual object. But compromises are necessary, and if you're skilled enough in the editors they will not make that much of a difference.

The last one does not consist of separate buildings, but one that has different facades. Basically, if you rotate it a certain way you will get a different building. The mess at the roof is actually a facade for a small, two story building in comparison to the multi-story facades along its sides. You can create some impressive skylines, like this with just one prop. The first picture is with the last prop in the list above, and the second picture is with the second prop and that last prop in the list above.




This can be done with interiors as well, especially if you don't want to create unique models at all or have filled up your slots. You don't need to rotate the additional thing on top of your interior, since you can just hide the interior itself in the ground.




You can create some pretty bizarre combinations, such as a lamppost and a set of rails, or even a fence, train station, and food stand all in one. But they save on complexity tremendously, as we've seen if we reduce the number of unique models.



Keep in mind that these props are best fit for where you cannot see the ground beneath. This means that multiprops may not work very well in multi-story interiors without specialized creation, on platforms where you can see the bottom, or at the edges of cliffs. If they are absolutely necessary, design your adventure such that the player will not see the unsightly objects attached to your Frankenstein for a prop.

Reduce unique models by making props that are more comprehensive and take up the entire complexity meter of their respective editors

This is one of most common mistakes I see people make in regards to efficient complexity usage: making individual floor sections, wall sections, etc. Especially when they classify them as buildings! If you want to cram as much as you want in an adventure, you cannot do this. Instead you must make entire rooms or hallways that use up as much complexity in the editor as you can budge into it. Same with the budget. Here are some examples:








In the first picture, we see the interior of the bar that was used in Legacy of Sensenet with the ceiling removed for demonstrative purposes. Note that I did not make individual wall sections, the individual bar props, chairs, etc. They are all in one creation. It is imperative that you do this as much as possible in your adventure, unless you need to include a detailed prop that hopefully is a disguised gate multi-prop or the rare interactive building prop.

In the second picture, we see the interior of one of the cavernous hallways in Those Who Were Left. Note here that I did not make the individual wall sections for the gigantic building: it is ALL in one creation. Note how I've tried to use up complexity and budget to its limits, with the wired interior walls, lights, and doors. I merely had to supersize this to make the gigantic interior section without using up so much complexity. There are some design problems when you use large props though, but I will cover that later.

In the third picture, we see a portion of the organic recycling facility in Deleted! Note how I put the vats and walkway as part of the creation, not separate creations to be assembled. I also put many details in, such as the ceiling supports.

In the fourth picture, we see a portion of the foyer in Legacy of Sensenet. Note that I have included a bookshelf, table, hat rack, crates, etc. They are integrated in the creation.

In the final picture, we see the pod laboratory in Deleted! Note how I have made all six pods as part of the creation, and the wall detail.

Overview

In short, if you want to reduce the rate at which your complexity is consumed, you must reduce the amount of unique models as well as high complexity objects such as creatures and buildings. Use them sparingly. Ask yourself: is this necessary for the story? Is this necessary for gameplay purposes? Keep in mind that these props were designed for the specific setting and story for my adventures. Your adventures may require some fine tuning to these strategies, should you use them. Also, it does take some skills and knowledge of the editor, such as what parts can be placed beyond the boundaries of the building editor.

The Gate Trick

Thanks to 101Gamer for telling me this.

So you've followed my advice and built an adventure with scenery that would make Nethellus proud. You've utilized buildings and disguised gates in accordance to this guide, and have been able to almost everything you want. But alas, the complexity meter still hits. You still have some creatures to place, an interior to finish, and a final boss battle to implement!

See, there's an anomaly with blue gates. Disguised or not, 90 of them will equal one complexity dot. But for some reason, the default blue gate is less complexity than a disguised one. This is not apparent until your adventure begins to reach high complexity. So that means if you're stuck at high complexity you can free up a few more slots for that last minute addition by temporarily reverting all of your disguised gates back to regular ones. How much does that do for you? Well, in Those Who Were Left (I was not aware of this when I created it) the complexity meter is full. Watch the difference before and after doing this:




You regain quite a bit of complexity (no really that's a generous amount), and if you are following my advice in terms of prop creation, you can get quite a lot done with just one or two dots. Basically, you go over the expected limit. This shares too, as Legacy of Sensenet utilized this.

Be warned that you must revert and re-disguise the gates (after adding what you want) in the same game session (do not close the adventure editor at all) or else you will have to manually redisguise the gates by searching through Sporepedia. If you have a lot of these gates in the same area it can get very confusing and frustrating. So if you're prone to unexpected crashes, try to ensure Spore is the only thing running while you are doing this. Also, if you revert a supersized prop (we will discuss this later) it will revert back to its original bounds so you will have to supersize it again.

This concludes the first lecture: Complexity Management. If there are any questions, comments, etc please tell me right away.


This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 03/12/2015 22:27:22


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MobsterMania

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Conflict Resolution & Prevention

This will probably be one of the shortest lectures, but still very important.

Many great adventure creators have fret over the many (now fixable glitches) of Spore GA, and have left the game.

Ryuujin wrote:
[Past Imperfect] was never finished because the legendary unfixed bugs of GA - the sun moving unpredictably between reloads of the same map (A dream sequence during the mission REQUIRED it be night-time), and quest objects that worked in early development suddenly started falling through the floor.


I've never had the first problem but the second problem seemed to be one of the major grievances of early adventure creators...which also happened to be among the most skilled and prominent. One would think that a glitch that even the most adept of creators could not solve must be impossible to work around, yes?

Quite the contrary.

You see, in high complexity adventures, everything cannot load up at once. Instead, creations are loaded in this order (courtesy of Advanced Guide to Adventures), although this was derived from testing. I would say this is fairly accurate though.

Pelicanthor wrote:Through adventure creating, I have found (somewhat), the order that elements of an adventure load.
Here's the order I have found so far:

1: Physics and planet (approx same load time)
2: Creatures
3: Gameplay objects and fixed objects
4: Buildings

I am not sure where the vehicles place yet.


As you can see, since buildings load up last creatures and gameplay objects will fall through. So, there has to be something that loads up quicker that would prevent both creatures and objects from getting stuck in interiors. This would also prevent Captains from beaming into buildings (this has happened many times).

-------------------------------------

One of the most common fixes I've found was to put upside-down jump-pads right underneath your desired creature/Captain/handheld object. I first used it in Words of Realization, after receiving complaints that in Words of Forsaken (these were older adventures part of my Words series adventures) the handheld objects that were necessary to continue the mission were stuck inside the shelves and tables. Only through camera tricks could one attain these. And sometimes, when you stumble upon a handheld object that isn't sunk into the floor, touching it could make it do just that.

You can imagine how frustrating that can be for your players, especially if they've progressed so far into the game. This is one of the reasons why Nethellus stopped making adventures like Ardok Thang: with the inconsistent performance of handheld objects, it made adventures unplayable and frustrating. Indeed, I checked the adventure in the editor and there are no jump pads underneath.

Upside-down Jump pads

(this was in Deleted!)


In that instant, all of the problems were solved. I did not receive any comments relating to missing objects or beaming inside of a building. Indeed, the fix is that simple. You can improve the reliability (this does not always work) by making whatever is standing on the pad invisible for the first act, if it isn't important in that first act. Also, as Sean10M suggested, you can also substitute the jump pad for a techpad (although it will not be invisible. You'll just have to sink it just far enough into the interior to not be seen). Apparently it's more reliable, but so far both methods work just fine. Oh how I wish I had a time machine...even though that's probably one of the most ridiculous motives to use such a device.

Crashing and other stuff you don't like

Ah, crashes. Our favorite feature of Spore's unstable coding. How it has been as fond of a memory as the game's editors.

Before I started working with my craptop (which runs Spore fine, actually), I used to play Spore on an iMac. Periodically, an "exception raised" error would occur and crash GA. I learned very quickly to save a lot. So there's not much to say here: save as frequently as you can. It is better to be safe than sorry. You can quickly do this by doing "Ctrl + S." I've been fortunate to not suffer the crippling technical difficulties with GA that most people have, but I still safe frequently as Spore will occasionally crash, though with not the frequency I suffered with the iMac.

Also, it's wise to make backups of not only your adventure but its creations as well. I usually just copy the entire My Creations folder to desktop or put it on a flash drive. You never know what might happen to the copy of the adventure. That said, I also recommend making various different copies or "Save As New" as opposed to "Replace". If your adventure starts acting funny, you could find the last "save" where it workekd fine. If crashing and lost progress wasn't enough, rarely your adventure may not upload correctly and replace entire creations within your palette. This may cause the adventure to appear as banned, as was the case of this:



I still have no idea why this happens, but a recent buddy of mine reported that sometimes the creations from an adventure would somehow upload "wrong" and be unable to be downloaded. Yet, in the example above all of the creations did upload, but the adventure file itself was corrupted such that upload would fail.

Replaced Creations!?

You're done with your adventure, and have published it to the masses. Suddenly, you get a comment.

"This is unplayable. Creation X obstructs the progression of the adventure in some way."


That doesn't sound good at all! You tested the adventure and nothing was amiss! If this is the case, you may be suffering from a defective creation within your adventure. For some reason, sometimes a creation will not load properly in an adventure due to faulty uploading (this is rare but it does happen) leading the game to replace the creation. Sometimes it will ban your adventure, other times it will make it unplayable.

What causes a defective creation? I have gotten this problem before, and for these reasons:

Very Flat Creations



If you're wondering why this blood splatter creation of mine is strangely tall, that's because had I made the splatter creation very thin it would cause this problem. One of my adventures is a Version 2 because the first version had such creations.

Hacked Creations & Cheated Creations

This is far less common, and usually only a problem if you forget to uninstall mods. If you have the Force Save mod enabled, you may have saved an "invalid" creation that would have otherwise not been saved. For example, in the development of Deleted! I made two buildings that were classified as City Halls but had factory parts! That's not possible. So then, make sure Force Save is not installed when you create your adventures.

Over-complex and addDNA props also will not upload correctly (for obvious reasons)

Server Errors

This is by far the most common that I've seen, and unfortunately beyond any of our control. The only fix is to find the defective creations and re-upload them under your own account (if they are someone else's). This can be a chronic problem for some people.

An alternative "fix" is to have a dedicated beta tester that you send a draft of your adventure to. Either send him/her a folder with all of the creations and adventure PNG, or upload your adventure under an alt (if you don't want the alt in your linage make two copies of the draft, so you have a fresh one for the final upload). If there are defective creations, tell your tester to take screenshots of the palette with those creations. I myself have acted as a "tester" to help upload starfoth's Payday adventure and Valera's castle defense.

If there are any more problems anyone would like to address so as to add to this lecture, please inform me right away.





This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 07/01/2014 17:00:28


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MobsterMania

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Reserved

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Awdred

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That's what I'm trying to figure out right now.

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Wow! This is cool. I'd love to learn more about making adventures. Especially since I plan on starting Disturbance part 2 as soon as I can get my hands on the adventure editor again.

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Awdred

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That's what I'm trying to figure out right now.

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Oh, and I'd love to help if you need any. I'm not the best though.

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Rebecca1208

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So, do you take requests on courses? Because I have a request on a course

HOW ON EARTH do you make it so when you inspect an object as part of an objective, the camera angle turns to a completely different scene, such as the computer screens in Those Who Were Left?

It'd probably be worth me dissecting your adventure rather than asking here, but it's something I'm sure other people might be able to take use of as well :p

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Raptor177

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Ah goody, an academy by the esteemed Mobster/Matthew himself! I will follow your words of wisdom!


MobsterMania

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These courses will take a while to write up, because I prefer to be comprehensive when it comes to giving advice on adventures (it's a more complex art than most people think).

HOW ON EARTH do you make it so when you inspect an object as part of an objective, the camera angle turns to a completely different scene, such as the computer screens in Those Who Were Left?


That will be covered in Design. However my first topic will be Complexity Management since that seems to be one of the biggest problems most creators have.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 06/28/2014 21:53:32


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Rebecca1208

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Quality > Quantity, looking forward to seeing the comprehensive guide for complexity

I've only ever had an issue with complexity once, but truth be told I usually made my maps either very open and empty, or naturally closed, like valleys and canyons.

But for when I get an adventure out, I want to go all out for it.

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saverin

Microbe

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Rebecca1208 wrote:
HOW ON EARTH do you make it so when you inspect an object as part of an objective, the camera angle turns to a completely different scene, such as the computer screens in Those Who Were Left?


He's using the fact that the camera always faces a building head on and at a certain distance. Once you know where the camera is positioned you can put a gate disguised as whatever you want the player to see in front of it (buildings disappear when close to the camera).

The distance of the camera from the building is determined by how large the building is. You can manipulate it by putting a block far above the main prop piece. That's how Mobster can shift the camera to a display outside of the room you are in.
Tikobe

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I'm interested in seeing what you got on terrain. I recently learned (I kid you not) that terrain brushes do have complexity (Albeit, at the cost of a separate complexity bar). The shock of learning terrain brushes are not an infinite sandbox you can play around with forever is like being a fly that got swatted out of the air.
pelicanthor

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I'll give this a good look after you're finished editing it.
Then perhaps I can offer information that may not have been included.

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MobsterMania

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Completed the first lecture on complexity management.

Peli, are you planning to play Spore again or are you just visiting, with spore long gone?

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saverin

Microbe

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Well that was helpful. I had been wondering if an object's individual complexity had any effect on adventure complexity, so thanks for clearing that up.
 
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